MLM and The FTC

MLM businesses are known to operate in all 50 U.S. states of the United States of America. New businesses may use terms such as “affiliate marketing” or “home-based business franchising”. Many pyramid schemes try to present themselves as legitimate MLM businesses. However, there are many people as well as courts who maintain that all MLMs are essentially pyramid schemes even if they are legal. My opinion, all companies are pyramids.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) states “Steer clear of multilevel marketing plans that pay commissions for recruiting new distributors. They’re actually illegal pyramid schemes. Why is pyramiding dangerous? Because plans that pay commissions for recruiting new distributors inevitably collapse when no new distributors can be recruited. And when a plan collapses, most people – except perhaps those at the very top of the pyramid – end up empty-handed.

“This also goes for any corporate company in corporate America”

In a 2004 Staff Advisory letter to the Direct Selling Association, the FTC states:

Much has been made of the personal, or internal, consumption issue in recent years. In fact, the amount of internal consumption in any multi-level compensation business does not determine whether or not the FTC will consider the plan a pyramid scheme. The critical question for the FTC is whether the revenues that primarily support the commissions paid to all participants are generated from purchases of goods and services that are not simply incidental to the purchase of the right to participate in a money-making venture.

The Federal Trade Commission warns “Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. Some are pyramid schemes. It’s best not to get involved in plans where the money you make is based primarily on the number of distributors you recruit and your sales to them, rather than on your sales to people outside the plan who intend to use the products.” and states that research is your best tool, giving eight steps to follow: 1.Find — and study — the company’s track record 2.Learn about the product 3.Ask questions 4.Understand any restrictions 5.Talk to other distributors (beware of shills) 6.Consider using a friend or adviser as a neutral sounding board or for a gut check 7.Take your time 8.Think about whether this plan suits your talents and goals

If you want to be Salesman, work for a company that makes You do all the research, or, Work for yourself with a Company who has already done all the leg work. http://instantpaydaynetwork.com/trosenfelt This company has done all the research, done all the leg work and built a system that sells itself, And it’s FREE!

The Federal Trade Commission issued a decision, In re Amway Corp., in 1979 in which it indicated that multi-level marketing was not illegal per se in the United States. However, Amway was found guilty of price fixing (by effectively requiring “independent” distributors to sell at the same fixed price) and making exaggerated income claims.

The FTC advises that multi-level marketing organizations with greater incentives for recruitment than product sales are to be viewed skeptically. The FTC also warns that the practice of getting commissions from recruiting new members is outlawed in most states as “pyramiding”. In April 2006, it proposed a Business Opportunity Rule intended to require all sellers of business opportunities—including MLMs—to provide enough information to enable prospective buyers to make an informed decision about their probability of earning money. In March 2008, the FTC removed Network Marketing (MLM) companies from the proposed Business Opportunity Rule:

The revised proposal, however, would not reach multi-level marketing companies or certain companies that may have been swept inadvertently into scope of the April 2006 proposal.

Walter J. Carl stated in a 2004 Western Journal of Communication article that “MLM organizations have been described by some as cults (Butterfield, 1985), pyramid schemes (Fitzpatrick & Reynolds, 1997), or organizations rife with misleading, deceptive, and unethical behavior (Carter, 1999), such as the questionable use of evangelical discourse to promote the business (Hopfl & Maddrell, 1996), and the exploitation of personal relationships for financial gain (Fitzpatrick & Reynolds, 1997)”. In China, volunteers working to rescue people from the schemes have been physically attacked.

MLM’s are also criticized for being unable to fulfill their promises for the majority of participants due to basic conflicts with Western cultural norms. There are even claims that the success rate for breaking even or even making money are far worse than other types of businesses: “The vast majority of MLM’s are recruiting MLM’s, in which participants must recruit aggressively to profit. Based on available data from the companies themselves, the loss rate for recruiting MLM’s is approximately 99.9%; i.e., 99.9% of participants lose money after subtracting all expenses, including purchases from the company.” In part, this is because encouraging recruits to further “recruit people to compete with [them]” leads to “market saturation.”

Another criticism is that MLM has effectively outlived its usefulness as a legitimate business practice. The argument is that, in the time when America was a series of relatively small, isolated towns and rural areas not easily accessible to small companies, MLM was a useful way to let people know of and buy products or services. But the advent of internet commerce, with its ability to advertise and sell directly to consumers, has rendered that model obsolete. Thus, today, nearly all modern MLMs ostensibly sell vastly overpriced goods and services (if there even is a real product or service involved at all) as a thin cloak of legitimacy, while their members are driven to recruit even more people into the MLM, effectively turning these programs into pyramid schemes.

Because of the encouraging of recruits to further recruit their competitors, some people have even gone so far as to say at best modern MLMs are nothing more than legalized pyramid schemes with one stating “Multi-level marketing companies have become an accepted and legally sanctioned form of pyramid scheme in the United States” while another states “Multi-Level Marketing, a form of Pyramid Scheme, is not necessarily fraudulent.”

In October 2010 it was reported that multilevel marketing companies were being investigated by a number of state attorneys general amid allegations that salespeople were primarily paid for recruiting and that more recent recruits cannot earn anything near what early entrants do.

This is the most ridiculous thing I’ve seen since I’ve started doing this…First of all how many people recruit people without being able to make money, second I have had people come on board and way surpass what I’ve made.. And I don’t make a dime off of him, because this company is 100% commission to you. You keep all the commissions. http://instantpaydaynetwork.com/trosenfelt You can’t give a system away for FREE if that is how you make your money…This system is FREE Get it NOW.

 

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